The walk at  http://jquarter.members.beeb.net

9. THE PEN MAKERS, & RIP VAN WINKLE


Explore the Birmingham Jewellery Quarter

 

THE EXTRA

This page reproduces in printable format the information contained in the right hand column of the walk page.

EXAMPLES OF THE THREE ARCHITECTURAL STYLES

(1) REGENCY

(2) ITALIANATE

(3) ARTS & CRAFTS


 

 

 

 

 

 

ARCHITECTURAL STYLES

Most of the larger buildings in the Jewellery Quarter are built in one of  three architectural styles. These are: (1) Late Georgian, or Regency, which predominated until about 1850. This is a restrained style, relying mainly on clean lines and good proportions for its pleasing effect. The Victoria Works is a good example. (2) Italianate, which was popular from 1850 to 1890. This is a much more ornate style. The window openings tend to be decorated and to have rounded tops. The Argent Centre is a good example of this style. (3) After 1890 Arts & Crafts (a reversion to traditional styles, building methods and materials)  became popular. The Gwenda Works, which we shall meet on the next section of the walk, provides an example of this later style. 

JOSEPH GILLOTT THE MAN

Joseph Gillott had a good reputation as an employer. He was an art lover, a friend of JMW Turner and the first owner of many of Turnerís finest works, including the famous picture of the Fighting Temeraire, which now hangs in the National Gallery. His two houses (although he lived and died in Westbourne Road, Edgbaston, he had a second home at Stanmore in Middlesex) were filled with works of art. He was also a sociable man, frequently to be seen at the theatre or enjoying a pint with his pals in the Hen & Chickens pub in New Street, which was next door to Thomas Attwood's bank. Unlike Josiah Mason, he was not a benefactor, giving almost nothing to charity. As a consequence, when he died in 1873 after a short illness, he was worth over £250,000, a huge fortune in those days and five times the value of Josiah Mason's estate. He died in 1873 after a short illness.

HENRY VAN WART

Henry Van Wart had the reputation of being a thoroughly nice man. He became a naturalised British Citizen and a respected  pillar of the Birmingham establishment, a councillor, alderman and magistrate, and lived on in his adopted city until his death in 1873 at the age of 90.

WAS JAMES WATT A NEIGHBOUR?

For a number of years James Watt lived at Harper's Hill, which I can't find on any old maps. But an entry in Wrightson's Directory gives the address of one John Lawrence, silversmith, as 'Frederick Street Harper's Hill', which raises the interesting possibility that James Watt might have been a neighbour of the Van Warts. 

QUIZ

Here's a little quiz for you to have a go at. We're going to walk up Legge Lane, and I want to suggest to you that Legge Lane differs in two significant respects from the streets - George Street, Caroline Street, Graham Street and so on - that we've met up to now, and that one can make a significant inference on the basis of those differences. On the next page I'll invite you to say what you think the relevant points of difference are, and what you infer from them, and I shall be awarding lavish quantities of points for correct answers.

 

LINKS

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Other sites: Joseph Gillott

Washington Irving (1), (2), (3)

The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

 

 

© 2001 Bob Miles